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Επιστροφή στο Forum : Casualty Reports - Accidents - Incidents - Serious Near Misses



Petros
04-04-2007, 10:24
Hot work related Accident

The tanker was in ballast and had quite a long voyage before she would reach her next port of call. During one of the weekly onboard work planning and maintenance meetings, a suggestion was made to take advantage of the ballast condition and do some minor hot work on the deck.

The Captain approved the hot work and it was decided that the physical work was to be undertaken by the fitter under supervision by the Chief Officer. As the welding commenced on a butterworth lid, all of a sudden they heard an alarming hissing sound and the two crew members started to run in opposite directions. Then a huge explosion occurred which caused massive damages to the ship, and more sadly the blast killed one of the crew members.


DISCUSSION:

Because of the risks involved in hot work there are always a set of safety precautions that should be thoroughly followed. These protective actions are different from ship owner to ship owner, but they all serve the same goal – they are put in place in order to minimise the risks. During the weekly maintenance meeting the welding was suggested as a good idea because of the ballast situation of the ship. But hot work allowance was not within the powers of the Master to decide. The final approval for hot work was to be made by the Ship Managers Office, but they unfortunately were never involved. Several safety measures were broken and the Masters approval was the first.

All of the necessary safety measures were well described in the company’s procedures. Nevertheless, they where ignored by the crew. Obvious crucial conditions like making sure the fans where running properly, to make sure the tank area was over pressurised and that adjacent areas were prepared were all ignored.

In this case the crew’s ignorance resulted in loss of life, an absolutely unacceptable outcome. The risks involved in hot work are well known and this is why the safety measures are numerous and the procedures rather rigid. But no procedures are stronger than the weakest link, and here the human element seems to be the root cause. When a ship is on a very long voyage between ports, boredom may easily overwhelm the crew. Mixed with a portion of leadership complacency and a strong hierarchy onboard, tragic incidents like this may be explained, but could never be accepted. Strong and robust procedures should still be kept in place, but in addition boredom and complacency of the crew should be focused as yet another risk factor. Managers, both onboard and ashore, should continuously address the potential risks embedded in the individuals.


USEFUL EXPERIENCE

■Be aware when you are bored or tired
■If something doesn’t seem right – it probably isn’t.

Source: Norwegian Hull Club - Casualty information

Petros
21-05-2007, 09:13
The following is a list of areas where an actual attack took place in the period 9 - 15 May 2007, as reported by the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre. A more detailed description of each incident can be found in the IMB website (http://www.icc-ccs.org/prc/piracyreport.php).

Suspicious craft:
Indonesia (03:18.0N - 123:33.0E)

Recently reported incidents:
Belawan Anchorage, Indonesia (03:55.35N - 098:46.79E)
3BSP 4 berth, Lahad Datu Port, Malaysia (05:01.03N - 118:21.13E)

Late Reports:
08.05.2007 Visakhapatnam Anchorage, India (17:38.3N - 083:22E)
07.05.2007 Balikpapan Pertamina Jetty No. 2, Indonesia (01:16.081S - 116:48.560E)

Please note that the piracy reports cover all types of ships.

Source: IMB & Intertanko

Petros
25-05-2007, 15:01
The following is a list of areas where an actual attack took place in the period 16 - 22 May 2007, as reported by the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) Piracy Reporting Centre. A more detailed description of each incident can be found in the IMB website (http://www.icc-ccs.org/prc/piracyreport.php).

Suspicious craft:

Fairway Buoy RACON 'B', Bonny River, Nigeria

Recently reported incidents:

"B" Inner Anchorage, Mombassa, Kenya

Late Reports:

15.05.2007: 210 NM from coast, Somalia (01:10N - 049:00E)
14.05.2007: 180 NM off Somalia (01:19.62N - 048:51.92E)
12.05.2007: Monrovia, Liberia
09.05.2007: Philippines (07:47N - 120:21E)
08.05.2007: Corentyne River, Suriname
08.05.2007: 10 km Off Escravos, Delta State, Nigeria
08.05.2007: Vung Tau anchorage, Ho Chi Minh Port, Vietnam (10:15.6N - 107:04.9E)
05.05.2007: Off Nigeria Coast, Nigeria
01.05.2007: Penington River, Bayelsa State, Nigeria

24.04.2007: 2.2 miles from Tema Port breakwater, Ghana
19.04.2007: Delta Region, Nigeria
06.04.2007: Lagos, Nigeria

07.01.2007: Pertamina Jetty 4, Plaju, Indonesia (02:59.1S - 104:05.2E)

Kindly note that the piracy reports cover all types of ships.

Source: IMB & Intertanko

Petros
02-07-2007, 15:44
Source: UK P&I CLUB

Petros
02-07-2007, 16:19
Source: NORWEGIAN HULL CLUB

Παναγιώτης
29-08-2007, 14:07
Systematic Analysis and Review of AFRAMAX Tankers incidents
A. Papanikolaou, E. Eliopoulou & A. Alissafaki
National Technical University of Athens, Athens, Greece
S. Aksu
Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom
S. Delautre
Bureau Veritas, Paris, France
N. Mikelis
Intertanko, London, United Kingdom
ABSTRACT: The paper presents detailed results of a comprehensive analysis of recorded AFRAMAX tanker
incidents, which occurred in the last twenty six years. It consists of a thorough review of accident/incident information,
the identification of significant trends with respect to the impact of ship design, of human and a
variety of other factors and the drawing of conclusions on AFRAMAX tanker incidents and of tankers in general.


The paper is accesible on the internet in http://www.naval.ntua.gr/~sdl/Publications/Proceedings/IMAM2005-POPC-WP2-T21-final.pdf

Παναγιώτης
16-12-2008, 16:50
Bulk Carrier casualties and incidents.

Presentation from seminar of INTERCARGO held in November 22 2006.



Joint Technical Semina

Παναγιώτης
22-12-2008, 17:45
The final report concerning the incident of MSC Napoli. This Report focuses on capturing the facts and actions taken by the Maritime and Coastguard Agency in dealing with the MSC Napoli incident. This Report also seeks to capture the lessons learned, conclusions reached and recommendations for future responses. Full text of report is anailable here http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/197-299_napoli_report_final-redux.pdf as well as a summary here http://www.mcga.gov.uk/c4mca/mcga07-home/newsandpublications/mcga-publications/mcga-napoli-report.htm